BLOCKBUSTER

MILITARY THROUGH THE HOLLYWOOD LENS
soldiers-vector-patrol-silhouette-18.png

Saturday, May 2, 2020

LOS ANGELES, CA 

7yykmq_large.png

As we  bring two powerful communities together in celebrating decades of collaboration , Blockbuster will illuminate their power of impact throughout history to make change, influence ideas and in safeguarding our most proud military traditions through the Hollywood lens.

White Background

BLOCKBUSTER GALA

ACADEMY OF UNITED STATES VETERANS | ARLINGTON | LAS VEGAS | HOME OF THE VETERANS AWARDS

—Pngtree—gold film tape_864568.png

SAT, SEP 18, 2021 | LAS VEGAS

THE NIGHT

MILITARY THROUGH THE HOLLYWOOD LENS.

Rolling out 100 feet of red carpet for our community. Our cast of A-list drinks, hors-d'oeuvres, and dinner will make your night worthy of Hollywood's top stars. 

Dress in your best Hollywood attire and win a presenting spot at 7th Annual Veterans Awards. 

EARLY BIRD TICKETS

VALID UNTIL JUNE 15TH

All tickets include, drinks, dinner, red carpet and gift bag.

MEMBERS $25

NON-MEMBERS $100

 

EARLY BIRD

SPONSORSHIP

LOGO ON
STEP AND REPEAT
LOGO ON WEBSITE 
SOCIAL MEDIA MENTION
PRESS RELEASE MENTION

MEMBERS $500

NON-MEMBERS $2500

WHY BLOCKBUSTER

Blockbuster or "cookie" was the name given to several of the largest conventional bombs used in World War II by the Royal Air Force (RAF). The term blockbuster was originally a name coined by the press and referred to a bomb which had enough explosive power to destroy an entire city block. The bombs then called Blockbusters were the RAF's HC (High Capacity) bombs. These bombs had especially thin casings that allowed them to contain approximately three-quarters of their weight in explosive, with a 4,000 pound bomb containing over 3,000 pounds (1,400 kg) of Amatol

A 1954 issue of Film Bulletin offers a theory as to how the movie-centric meaning of “blockbuster” came about, according to Ammon Shea, a writer known for his work on the English language. 

One Film Bulletin article that can be viewed via the digital library nonprofit Internet Archive reads: “From exploitation-minded vice-president [Max E.] Youngstein came the term ‘block-buster’ to describe attractions that gross at least $2,000,000 in the U.S. and Canada.”

“The word originated with the powerful bombs that the British Royal Air Force used to decimate German cities during World War II, the so-called blockbusters,” Dargis wrote. “It soon entered the vernacular, appearing in advertisements before the end of the war, and as a clue in a 1950 crossword puzzle in this newspaper (46 across).”

I feel the need . . . the need for speed. 

 

            — Lt. Pete "Maverick" Mitchell, "Top Gun" (1986)

War isn’t hell at all. It’s man at his best, the highest morality he’s capable of. It’s not war that’s insane, you see. It’s the morality of it. It’s not greed or ambition that makes war: it’s goodness. Wars are always fought for the best of reasons — for liberation or manifest destiny. Always against tyranny and always in the interest of humanity. So far this war, we’ve managed to butcher some 10 million humans in the interest of humanity. Next war it seems we’ll have to destroy all of man in order to preserve his damn dignity. It’s not war that’s unnatural to us, it’s virtue. As long as valor remains a virtue, we shall have soldiers. So, I preach cowardice. Through cowardice, we shall all be saved. 

 

                                        -The Americanization of Emily (1964)

We're Airborne. We don't start fights, we finish 'em! 

             

                     —Galvan, "Hamburger Hill" (1987)

Never tell a soldier that he does not know the cost of war.

 

                     - Lt. General Frank Benson “Eye in the Sky” (2015)

When I go home people will ask me, ‘Hey Hoot, why do you do it man? What, you some kinda war junkie?’ You know what I’ll say? I won’t say a goddamn word. Why? They won’t understand. They won’t understand why we do it. They won’t understand that it’s about the men next to you, and that’s it. That’s all it is.

 

                                  -Norman "Hoot" Hooten, "Black Hawk Down" (2001)